Tag Archives: daley

Connected to Chicago (05-05-2019) Special Guest-Assessor Fritz Kaegi

Joining the show this week is Cook County Assessor Fritz Kaegi. Kaegi describes how is improving the Cook County Assessor’s office, Gives details on what a property tax assessment is, and ways to modernize.

Bill welcomes in the Round Table to discuss the week in news, and what’s to come. Joining the show this week is Ray Long from the Chicago Tribune,Greg Hinz of Crains, Fran Spielman and Lynn Sweet of The Chicago Sun-Times. The conversation kicks off with a look back at Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s time in office, Governor Pritzker is looking to get the graduated income tax passed in Springfield, and Mayor-elect Lightfoot will be in Washington D.C. next week. What’s to come?

This week’s Connected to Chicago segment is with Nick Gale, and focuses on May being designated Mental Health Month.

We talk with Paul Gionfriddo, president and CEO of Mental Health America, which started Mental Health Month 70 years ago to raise awareness about mental health conditions and the importance of good mental health for everyone.

A new report finds that Illinois ranks 11th in prevalence of mental Illness and access to care rankings. Gionfriddo says that’s a good standing.

This year’s theme, “4Mind4Body,” explores the topics of animal companionship, spirituality and religion, humor, work-life balance, and recreation and social connections as ways to boost mental health and general wellness.

Folks can also visit a tool kit that Mental Health America has put together at mentalhealthamerica.net/may

Connected to Chicago (04-28-2019) with Bill Cameron

Joining the show this week is Mayor-elect Lori Lightfoot, and Illinois House GOP Leader Jim Durkin. Lightfoot describes how things are taking shape in assembling the new Mayoral administration, Rocky Wirtz sending a memo in hopes of revamping relations with the business community, and Jim Durkin joins the show to discuss how Governor Pritzker is being investigated. Durkin also answers the question of if there will be an elected school board in Chicago.

Bill welcomes in the Round Table to discuss the week in news, and what’s to come. Joining the show this week is Ray Long from the Chicago Tribune, Heather Cherone of The Daily Line, Fran Spielman and Lynn Sweet of The Chicago Sun-Times. The conversation kicks off with
expert analysis of “Toilet Gate”, Terrible news out of Crystal Lake, and will Lori Lightfoot’s Mayoral adminstration improve relations with the business community?

This week’s community spotlight is with Nick Gale, and focuses on Attorney General Kwame Raoul’s effort to pass legislation that will protect consumers from high-priced alternative retail electric and gas suppliers. Raoul says the companies claim to offer cheaper energy rates than traditional utility companies but are almost always more expensive.

Senate Bill 651, or the Home Energy Affordability and Transparency Act, would create transparency by equipping consumers with information so that they can understand what signing up with an alternative supplier will mean for their utility bills. The bill also protects energy assistance funds by ensuring public dollars cannot be expended on overpriced energy supplier contracts. SB 651 is sponsored by Senate Majority Leader Kimberly Lightford.

Steve Bernas, president of the Better Business Bureau of Chicago and Northern Illinois tells consumers how to protect themselves when presented with such offers.

Connected to Chicago (04-21-2019) Mayor Richard M. Daley Retrospective

Former Mayor Richard M. Daley turns 77 next Wednesday April 24th. Bill plays the most memorable moments from the Mayor’s 22 years in office.

Bill welcomes in the Round Table to discuss the week in news, and what’s to come. Joining the show this week is Ray Long from the Chicago Tribune, Heather Cherone of The Daily Line, Fran Spielman and Lynn Sweet of The Chicago Sun-Times. The conversation kicks off with expert analysis on the Mueller Report. Mayor-elect Lightfoot looks to get rid of Aldermanic prerogative when she takes office in May, and is a graduated income tax taking shape in Springfield?

John Dempsey speaks with Colton Grace, a spokesman for a group called S.A.M., which stands for Smart Approaches to Marijuana. They talk about his group’s opposition to the idea of legalizing recreational marijuana in Illinois.

Connected to Chicago (02-24-2019) Special Guest-Bill Daley

Joining the show this week is Bill Daley. The Mayoral election will take place this Tuesday, Cameron and Daley discuss issues affecting the City of Chicago. Bill Daley describes his way to reduce crime, freeze property taxes, and ways to keep people from moving out of city. Jussie Smollett is also discussed. Should Smollett apologize to the city of Chicago for his actions?

In this week’s round table segment, Bill is joined by Ray Long of the Chicago Tribune, Lynn Sweet and Fran Spielman of the Chicago Sun-Times, Greg Hinz of Crain’s, and Heather Cherone editor of The Daily Line. The Round Table opens up with expert analysis and a preview of what to expect in the upcoming mayoral election. Has the media circus surrounding the Jussie Smollett story over shadowed the upcoming election? Governor Pritzker delivers his budget address. What can we expect to see in the future?

This week’s community spotlight segment is with John Dempsey. Cook County Treasurer Maria Pappas new study says there are more workers drawing government pensions in Cook County than there are workers in the County paying into those pensions.

Happy 75th Birthday, Richard M. Daley!

By Bill Cameron, WLS-AM 890

(CHICAGO) Today is a red-letter day for former Mayor Richard Daley.

Bill Cameron says it’s a milestone birthday for him. Richard M. Daley is 75-years-old today, a good time to hear him again.

Daley the city’s longest serving mayor did leave the city and school finances in a mess, but moments like that still make Bill Cameron miss the guy.

Undisclosed medical condition could affect Daley testimony

(CHICAGO) Attorneys for Richard M. Daley said a medical condition could affect the former mayor’s deposition in a federal lawsuit alleging torture under former Chicago Police Cmdr. Jon Burge.

Daley’s condition, though undisclosed, is the subject of an “Attorneys’ Eyes Only” protective order that was granted by U.S. District Judge Amy St. Eve on Wednesday, the Chicago Sun-Times is reporting.

The order provides that Daley’s medical records — including his private health information, “Mental Health Communications, and/or Mental Health Records” — are to be submitted under seal, court filings show. Those records are “for no other litigation or purposes.”

Alonzo Smith filed the lawsuit against Daley and Burge in 2016, alleging that detectives working under Burge tortured him into confessing to murder in 1983. Smith spent 20 years in prison after he says detectives Peter Dignan and John Byrne beat and suffocated him with a plastic bag to force him to confess.

Daley’s deposition was set for January, but last month, Daley’s attorney Terrrence Burns said, “There is an issue relative to [Daley’s] medical condition,” according to court records.

Smith’s attorneys argued that making Daley’s medical records for “Attorneys’ Eyes Only” would prevent them from review by a health professional. A status hearing is scheduled for Monday in federal court.

“As a defendant, we are absolutely entitled to depose him,” Flint Taylor, one of Smith’s attorneys, previously told the Sun-Times. “We intend to question him about his alleged role in the extensive coverup of the racist pattern and practice of torture perpetrated under the command of Jon Burge.”

It is not the first time that Daley has been set to testify in one of the many civil rights cases rooted in allegations of torture by detectives under Burge’s command, though in previous cases the city has settled the lawsuits before Daley was questioned.

Daley’s testimony in the latest case was set up by a ruling last year by St. Eve, stating that Smith’s lawyers should be allowed to probe how much Daley knew about the alleged torture that took place while he was mayor, though the ruling found that he couldn’t be held liable for misconduct in prosecutions that took place while he was Cook County state’s attorney.

The former mayor’s health has prevented him from giving testimony in the past.

In 2014, Daley was subpoenaed to testify in the city’s lawsuit to break the sweetheart lease the Park Grill restaurant in Millennium Park was given while he was mayor.

After reviewing affidavits on Daley’s medical condition behind closed doors, the Park Grill’s operators and lawyers agreed to withdraw their subpoena to put the former mayor on the witness stand, and the case was settled last year. Before that agreement, Daley’s lawyers argued his undisclosed medical condition would make it a hardship for him to take the witness stand.

In January 2014, Sun-Times reported that Daley suffered a stroke when he was rushed to Northwestern Memorial Hospital the same day his nephew Richard J. “R.J.” Vanecko pleaded guilty to involuntary manslaughter in the death of David Koschman in 2004.

Taylor has twice sought to put Daley under oath in Burge cases, only to have the city offer a multimillion-dollar settlement his clients could not refuse. Smith’s lawsuit alleges Daley was aware of abuse by Burge’s men as far back as the early 1980s, when Daley was state’s attorney and did nothing to stop the abuse after he became mayor in 1989.

A representative for Daley could not be reached for comment.

Former mayor Richard Daley could testify in police torture case

(CHICAGO) Former Mayor Richard M. Daley is set be questioned under oath about police torture by disgraced Chicago Police Cmdr. Jon Burge and his “midnight crew” of detectives, a long-running scandal that simmered under Daley’s watch both as mayor and Cook County State’s Attorney, the Chicago Sun-Times is reporting.

Lawyers for the city last week received notice of a deposition, set for Jan. 17, from lawyers representing Alonzo Smith in a federal civil rights lawsuit against the city, Burge, and detectives who served under him in Area 2, city Law Department spokesman Bill McCaffrey confirmed Monday.

Smith spent 20 years in prison after, he claims, detectives Peter Dignan and John Byrne beat and suffocated him with a plastic bag to force Smith to confess to a 1983 murder.

“We expect that the city will present Daley for deposition either on that date or soon thereafter at a mutually agreeable date,” Smith’s attorney, Flint Taylor, wrote in an email to the Chicago Sun-Times. “As a defendant, we are absolutely entitled to depose him. We intend to question him about his alleged role in the extensive coverup of the racist pattern and practice of torture perpetrated under the command of Jon Burge.”

McCaffrey declined to comment on the case.

It is not the first time that Daley has been set to testify in one of the many civil rights cases rooted in allegations of torture by detectives under Burge’s command, though in previous cases, the city has settled the lawsuits before Daley was questioned.

Daley’s testimony was set up by a ruling last month by U.S. District Judge Amy St. Eve, stating that Smith’s lawyers should be allowed to probe how much Daley knew about the torture that took place while he was mayor, though the ruling found that he couldn’t be held liable for misconduct in prosecutions that took place while he was State’s Attorney.

Smith’s attorney, Flint Taylor, has twice sought to put Daley under oath about Burge cases, only to have the city offer a multimillion-dollar settlement his clients could not refuse. Smith’s lawsuit alleges Daley was aware of abuse by Burge’s men as far back as the early 1980s, when Daley was State’s Attorney, and did nothing to stop the abuse after he became mayor in 1989.

The city paid out $5.5. million earlier this year to 57 victims who were tortured by Burge or his men, a payout Mayor Rahm Emanuel said was part of a “moral reckoning” over abuse that spanned two decades. All told, the city has paid out $100 million in legal fees and settlements related to Burge cases, dating back as far as 1982. Burge was fired in 1993.

— Chicago Sun-Times